Cabins at Decatur Head

Decatur Head cabin 1

Decatur Island is a private island in Washington State’s San Juan Islands. There isn’t much public land, but it does have a public boat ramp and the beaches are mostly state property. There isn’t much access for anyone who isn’t staying there though so crowds are non-existent on the island. Much of the land is forested, but there are homes and vacation houses with gravel roads providing access around the island. There’s not a lot in the way of rentals other than a couple bnb’s. The island has a couple tombolos, which is a bit of land that would be a separate island except for a connection through a sandbar or narrow strip of land.

cabin 8 kitchen

Decatur Head is one of those tombolos. The privately owned cabins there were built in the 1970’s and belong to the Decatur Head Beach Association, whose members use the cabins. There are 8 total with one for the caretakers to live in and 7 for the members vacation use. These cabins sleep from 4-10 people, but each of them have just one bathroom.

inside cabin 8

Although most people will never be able to stay there, it’s still fun to see the inside of some of these rustic cabins. Each one is different both inside and out. Local elements were integrated into the original decor and though some things have been updated over the decades since, things like driftwood furniture and sometimes stairways still remain.

top of the stairway in cabin 8

Cabin 8 is one of the larger ones that sleeps 10. It has 2 bedrooms and a loft with a bunch of mattresses on the floor.

loft bedroom cabin 8

The stairway winds up through a hole in an open sided ledge with a doorway into the bunkroom. The one bathroom in the cabin sits on the lower level between the two bedrooms.

A-frame cabin

All of the cabins have the bathroom on the main level. Not all of them have upper stories. They do all have fireplaces except for cabin 2, the one A-frame style cabin which has a wood stove.

view from the loft in cabin 8

The living room has 2 couches and lamps mounted on rustic wooden tables. The full kitchen has a picnic table for eating space, and another one without the benches for putting things on. Dishes and pans and other kitchen essentials are provided, but people have to bring all their own linens and paper products as well as food and bedding. Access to the island is by private boat or island charter service. There is no garbage service so all garbage leaves with the guests.

cabin 6

Cabin 6 is another two story cabin. It’s a bit smaller than cabin 8, but also holds 10 people. Access to the second level in this one is more of a ladder than a stairway.

inside cabin 6

The upstairs has a bedroom and a loft area with a couple beds and a futon. Downstairs has 2 bedrooms as well as the bathroom, kitchen, and living room areas.

loft view of cabin 6 living room

This cabin also has a picnic table style table for eating on. It also has a couple couches and rustic end tables.

outside cabin 8

Outdoor areas by some cabins have fire pits.

totem pole

Cabin 8 even has its own totem pole.

cabin 5 is just one story

Cabins 5 and 7 are just one story, which are similar in size and layout to the lower level of the larger cabins.

living room in cabin 8

Every cabin has its own unique character inside and out.

cabin 8 has a deck shaped like the bow of a boat

copyright My Cruise Stories 2021

About LBcruiseshipblogger

MyCruiseStories blog tells stories about adventures in cruising on ships big and small. Things to do onboard and in port. Anything connected to cruising. Also food, travel, recipes, towel animals, and the occasional random blog.
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